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HealthSelf Improvement

Written by: Michael McKinney, CTB Why the heck would anyone run a 50k, let-alone a 50k trail run over difficult and at-times dangerous terrain? It’s a question I’ve been asked a few times as I prepared for my first ultra trail run a couple of weeks ago. It’s one thing to love running, but why was I changing it up? I’d run a few road marathons, so why not focus on improving my time? Why take my running off-road while increasing the distance? I’ve been pondering these questions in the days since I competed in the Shawnee Hills 100m/100k/50k. After all, the training was intense and time-consuming, the run itself was difficult and risky as trails and rocks and streams aren’t always the safest running surfaces, and I’m fairly comfortable at home with my wife and three great daughters. What compelled me to get out there, to push myself harder, to risk failure or injury? *** I didn’t start running until I was 36 years old. I ran off and on for a few years until my wife, Brandy—a runner herself who had competed in a couple of half-marathons— encouraged me to run my first 1/2 marathon five years later. I was hooked to the sport from that first race, so I began training regularly with an online coach because I wanted to run a full marathon, and I did—it was a great experience. Since that time I’ve run a couple of marathons, a few 1/2 marathons, and an entire 5k dressed as the Easter Bunny. I have to admit, I didn’t plan to run the whole race in that hot-as-hell bunny suit, but the looks on the other runners faces as I ran along beside them, my big bunny eyes wide and my ears flopping, spurred me on. Running as a bunny was challenging, but not challenging enough. Neither were the marathons. And not because I'm an adrenaline junky or believe myself to be an elite athlete. I’m neither, but I do believe trail-running has a few benefits that make the risk of injury and the intense training more than worth it. Trail runs are less peopled. The Shawnee Hills 50k portion of the run had only 39 competitors and 34 finishers. This means that as a runner, I spent more time alone, had more time in my head. There is a meditative aspect to running that is amplified in the woods where everything is green and the breeze rustles through the leaves. At the same time, the small number of other folks on the trail made it imperative for me to create connections with other runners. This helped me to keep track of the trail’s twists and turns and created a safety net. This 50k trail run required me to pay attention in a way that we rarely do in our regular lives. Roots and rocks and ditches make missteps not just possible, but probable for the runner who isn’t paying attention. And paying attention to the trail isn’t the whole of it. I also had to pay attention to my hydration and my nourishment in a way I have never needed to before. Injury on a trail run is a real risk. So back to that question I started with—why the heck would anyone run a 50k trail run?  Sure, connections in a running community, solitude, building attention skills are great answers, and they all contribute to my love of the sport. But here’s the real reason. Because it’s fun and challenging. Seriously, it is that simple—being comfortable is great, but it can also be limiting. I believe it’s important that we push ourselves out beyond the edges of our comfort zones, that we allow ourselves to be vulnerable, to risk failure. I didn’t know if I could finish a 50k trail run, and I don’t know if I can finish another, but that’s okay. It’s where I want to live at least part of my life, on the wild trail where not-knowing can bring the biggest rewards. ...
3PLIndustry NewsThird-Party LogisticsTransportationTrucking

Our thoughts and prayers are with all those who have been devastated by the relentlessness of Hurricane Harvey. We are inspired by the strength and bravery shown by the first responders, volunteer rescuers, and residents who are helping in the wake of this landmark event. Along with the visible damage left by Hurricane Harvey, supply chain networks have been thrown out of wack and the storm is expected to cost the economy tens of billions of dollars. Below are some key points you should be aware of as relief efforts in the area continue. I'm not in Texas, why is my capacity impacted? Houston is one of the biggest cities in the country, and because of that, the supply chain the city serves has the market in a state of flux. Trucks have been unable to get empty and the ability to find a reload has been very challenging and will continue to be so for the immediate future. Shippers will need to understand this and implement certain procedures to make this scenario less problematic in the coming weeks. We encourage shippers to offer longer lead time, give drivers flexibility when it comes to shipping hours and ship dates, be flexible with equipment requirements if at all possible, avoid unrealistic expectations and show empathy for carriers as they battle through the change and devastation left by Harvey. One thing we have seen as a course of action from shippers to continue to serve their respective markets is changing the origin points in the southwestern United States. This will help goods reach those who need it most but will have an immediate impact on several markets. To combat this, storm relief is being sent into the area from FEMA-designated points. FEMA sets the market for transactional transportation in these lanes, but this also impacts the transactional market rates to all destinations from those origins. Along with the issues facing the trucking industry, people across the country will feel the economic impact left by Harvey. Houston is a massive hub for the oil and gas industry, producing half of the petroleum and gas exports in the United States. Harvey has forced 13 refineries to completely or partially shut down, which will lead to nearly two million barrels of lost production. That means higher gas prices around the country. Harvey will also have a major impact in the plastics industry. Houston is responsible for 70 percent of the nation's ethylene, which is the main ingredient in plastics. Experts are saying 37 percent of U.S.-based ethylene production will be disrupted by the storm. This will impact the economy but to a lesser extent than the oil and gas industry. All told, Harvey has and will continue to leave a lasting impact on the trucking industry and the economy as a whole. Time and patience dealing with these changes will be necessary and beneficial to all. Feel free to call the AM Transport team if you would like our feedback in what we're seeing in the market and what we expect to see in the coming weeks. Example Carrier Network Shipping INTO storm impacted area halted OUTBOUND shipping lanes shut down Equipment unavailable to meet customer commitments as it has not been repositioned ...
Meet the TeamOffice Environment

Written By Erik Jensen CTB Here at AM Transport, we have a number of fun events and gatherings, but my personal favorite is our annual golf outing. This year’s outing took place last Friday (8/18) at Richland Country Club and didn’t disappoint! Golf balls flew everywhere and laughs rumbled all over course. The outing is such a great time it’s easy to forget the hard work and the heightened anticipation in the office the week before the event. Here is a quick pre-golf-outing primer. Q: Who plans the event? A: Hillary and Rob do the lion’s share of the work in making the event come together. Q: Who takes part in the event?  A: Employees of A.M. Transport and their spouses. This year we had 8 teams and 33 participants. Q: How are the teams decided? A: No one truly knows how the teams are decided, and this remains one of the big mysteries in the AMT office. We all want to know who this year’s teammates will be, but we aren’t informed until the Friday Morning Meeting. At this point, the anticipation level has peaked and we are all ready to roll. The most difficult thing for some of us (yours truly) is getting through the rest of the day! Q: What takes place at the golf course? A: Well, golf of course, duh! Most of us arrived at Richland Country Club a little after 5 PM and we hit the links at 5:30. Each golf cart came with a cooler full of cold beverages and a boatload (guess I should have said “cartload”) of fun. Once we finished up on the course we all met in the pavilion to share pizza and horror stories from our round on the course. Q: Who won? A: After a bit of debate, it seems that Team One ( Michael, Heath, Hillary and Brittany) came away with the victory. Team Three (Coach “Old Eric”, David, Connor and Alyicia) claimed to finish their round nine under par, but no one believed them, rightfully. Coach’s teams have a tendency to fib just a bit. All in all, the golf outing is a great time. It gives us a chance to hang out after work and cut back while doing it. Anticipation for next year’s event is building already!...
CommunityOffice EnvironmentUncategorized

Written by Jordan Pottorff, CTB Monday marked the first total solar eclipse that was visible from coast-to-coast across the contiguous United States since 1918, and to say people were excited for it would be the understatement of the year. The national media covered the eclipse for what seemed like the entire day, social media was buzzing with eclipse-related posts, and people came in droves to areas of totality to witness the rare natural phenomenon. Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, IL, was the epicenter of the event and the town expected an influx of over 45,000 people for the viewing of the eclipse. Surrounding towns, national parks and roadways also saw increased traffic as southern Illinois became one of the most prominent places in the country for the day. With us being based in Olney, which is a small town in southeastern Illinois and just a couple hours away from Carbondale, we had the privilege of seeing nearly 98% totality at our peak time of 1:22 pm. We did what millions of others did across the country by purchasing our official eclipse glasses and celebrating with moon-themed foods while stepping outside to catch glimpses from time to time. Despite it being an overcast day, the hours and minutes leading up to our peak viewing time looked promising but as it got closer to 1:22 dark clouds started to form over our office and eventually ended up blocking the eclipse completely when it mattered most. We did get to witness the sky change to what it would look like in the early evening and confused cicadas began to chirp, but to summarize it briefly; it was a letdown. Our viewing area and the forecast leading up to Monday made it seem like we were in for a treat, and although it was still a cool event to witness, the hype didn’t materialize. What we had all hoped to see was blocked by a dark cloud. It was your typical “Aww, shucks” moment. I’m sure you can point to several moments in your life where the hype of an event didn’t materialize and you really had no choice but to accept it and make the best of the situation. A dark cloud put a damper on our day but I learned this morning that Olney will be in complete totality when the next total solar eclipse dawns on us on April 8, 2024. You can bet the nation will be watching again, and for our sake let’s hope it’s a cloudless day....
Community

Written By Justin Hatten, CTB One of the values at AM Transport Services is community as employees participate in local events throughout the year. On August 5, AM Transport Carrier Managers Joe Eagleson, Sam Rodgers and Colby Shawver took part in the seventh annual Richland County Recreation Council White Squirrel Triathlon with Eagleson pedaling 14.6 miles on his bicycle, Rodgers competing in the 5K run and Shawver swimming 200 meters for the “Transport Bandits.” The trio placed third out of seven teams in the male division with a time of 1:15:04.80, behind Unfair Advantage (1:08:22.60) and Splash, Flash and Dash (1:12:56.95). Competing in his first triathlon, Eagleson finished the leg in 46:30 on his Kona Jake CX, a cyclocross bike built to withstand terrain that varies from asphalt and gravel to dirt and mud. “The White Squirrel Triathlon was a blast,” said Eagleson, who puts in 50 to 75 miles a week, riding to work nearly every day. “I enjoyed how many competitors encouraged each other throughout the bike portion the most.  I heard ‘Good job’ or ‘Keep it up’ plenty of times, even though everyone was huffing and puffing their way down Saint Marie Road. “The main preparation I made was riding up hills to get ready for the Saint Marie Road hill that I would have to ride over twice.” Rodgers runs 15 to 20 miles each week and recorded a 3.1-mile time of 22:40 during his first triathlon. “Definitely not the last,” Rodgers said. “I will be doing some full triathlons in the future for sure. “It was a great experience and a fun atmosphere. Everyone involved was very friendly and welcoming. They gave out some awesome swag to participants. It was absolutely perfect weather to be out and about.” With the temperature in the 50s the night before and at race time Saturday morning, Shawver braved chilly water at Olney’s Musgrove Aquatic Center to clock a time of 4:57. “It was pretty frigid but after the initial shock, the adrenalin kicked in and took over,” said Shawver, who swam several times a week in the pool at his house training for his triathlon debut. “I loved it. A lot of the community was cheering on everyone. I will do it next year also.” Commitment is another AM Transport value, which the “Transport Bandits” showed while working as a team to earn a top-three finish....
Trucking

Written By: Erik Jensen, CTB The long-awaited electronic logging device (ELD) mandate is slated to come into effect on December 18, but as the date gets closer, the battle between the supporters and detractors of the upcoming law is increasingly contentious. The supporters of the mandate continue to state how beneficial ELDs are for carriers and their drivers.  Through ELDs, carriers are able to track their drivers with GPS tracking, and as we all know, this has become an expectation in our industry. The benefits aren’t limited to just tracking, though, as ELDs are also connected to the vehicle’s diagnostic port, which allows fleets to stay on top of any vehicle maintenance issues. ELDs will also benefit drivers through reduced paperwork, allowing them to spend more time behind the wheel—and thus safer roads. The FMCSA estimates that ELDs will help save 26 lives every year. Seems like a home run, right? Not so fast. The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) and a number of small carriers are fighting hard to stall the mandate from going into effect in December. These groups are seeking clarifications on the technical specifications and enforcement aspects of the mandate and feel that implementation should be delayed until these specifics are clarified. OOIDA and other carriers argue that the mandate violates truckers’ amendment rights to privacy by tracking them in real time—not to mention the financial burdens it will put on small carriers and owner-operators to purchase and maintain ELDs. The fighting and lobbying doesn’t stop there. They recently got Congress involved. Just a couple weeks ago, U.S. Representative Brian Babin of Texas introduced a bill in effort to delay the implementation of ELDs by at least two years. Babin feels forcing smaller carrier fleets to implement these devices is unfair to small businesses. In a story on trucker.com, Babin said, “While technology like ELDs have great promise, I didn’t come to Washington to force these ideas on small businesses – and neither did President Trump.” Babin followed this up saying, “If trucking companies want to continue implementing and using ELDs, they should go right ahead. But for those who don’t want the burden, expense and uncertainty of putting one of these devices in every truck they own by the end of the year, we can and should offer relief.” Babin’s bill and comments were met with disdain by the American Trucking Associations (ATA), who fully supports the upcoming mandate. ATA’s executive vice president of advocacy, Bill Sulllivan, released a statement saying, “It is incumbent on regulators and on Congress to dismiss this last-ditch try by some to evade critically important safety laws.” Sullivan went on saying the mandate is “common sense, data-supported regulation” and the arguments against it are “at best specious and at worst outright dishonest arguments.” ATA also cited an 11.7% drop in crash rates and 50% drop in Hours of Service violations when carriers switched from paper logs to ELDs, according to a 2014 administration report compiled by the department of transportation. So who is going to win this battle? No one knows for sure, but if one had to guess, the money would be on the mandate going into effect as planned in December. In an article published on Transport Topics website, staff reporter Eugene Mulero expounded on the subject and said Babin’s bill is “pretty much dead on arrival, since it lacks support from GOP leadership, a Senate companion bill, and backing from the White House." In other words—good luck to those wanting to delay the implementation mandate. The next couple months promise to be interesting. Stay tuned for more news....
Meet the Team

Written by Steph If you are a mom, you are a working mom. It’s a full-time job. But some moms also work out of the home because we want to or need to. Having a career is complicated by motherhood, even when you love your non-Mom job as much as I do. My mom-job begins when the alarm starts starts its annoying beep at 530 AM. How lovely it would be if I could just get ready for work, but I can’t. I have to allow extra time for my daughter to complain about waking up, to decide what clothes are appropriate for her social life, to choose between PopTarts or eggs. If school is in session, this process is further complicated by homework that might be lost or unfinished, lunches that need to be made or paid for, and transportation which is usually, you guessed it—the Mom! Oh, what I wouldn’t give for an extra 15 minutes of sleep. Let’s not forget about daycare. Who hasn’t had to drag a reticent child to daycare with a child or two hanging on the legs, screaming not to be left? I’ve been there, done that. And all before 7AM. It’s no wonder that half the time, I walk out the door remembering all the stuff I have forgotten. If you have kids, there are always papers to be filled out and turned in! When I arrive at AM Transport, I’ve already worked a half-day! I love my career, and I put everything I have into my work day—including using my lunch hour to pay bills, run to the grocery store for supper supplies, pop into the post office for stamps or a package, stop by the gas station for a refueling. Why would anyone use their lunch hour in such a fashion? I’ll tell you why—kids are the slowest individuals on the planet. Running errands with kids isn’t my idea of a good time. I’d rather eat a sandwich on the go. When I leave work, I head straight for my girl with the grand hopes that she has had a good day. Rarely does she get into the car without the words, “I’m hungry.” Seriously, do kids eat all the time, or only when their moms are around? And thus begins the second half of my mom-work day. You know the drill—dinner, practices, ball games, dishes, laundry, homework, couch-time with folks you gave birth to. Did I forget yard work, housecleaning, bath time—I’m not sure this list ends. Until bedtime, that is! Settling into sleep is a great time for me to remember all the things I wish I’d completed—texting my mother back, responding to that Snapchat from my best friend, RSVPing the birthday party next weekend and getting a birthday present. Luckily there’s always lunch hour the next day. If you are like me, family life and a great job are worth all the sacrifices and hard work. So a big high five to you moms out there! You definitely deserve that glass of wine tonight!  ...

ARE YOU SICK OF WAITING FOR MATERIAL TO ARRIVE AT THE JOBSITE OR EVENT SITE? 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 ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A TEAM THAT HAS THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY MATCHED WITH THE YEARS OF INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE TO MAKE SURE YOUR PROJECT STAYS ON TRACK? THEN WE REALLY NEED TO TALK! “I have been working with AM Transport Services for 15 years and they flat get it done!” – Brian, Commercial HVAC Manf. ...