Best Practices

Best PracticesTransportation

The Business of Business is Simple "The business of business is simple. All you really need is what's listed in this post." - Geoffrey James This repost is about an article written on Inc.com by Geoffrey James, and it is essentially a TL;DR version of some incredibly simple, but very useful, things you need to know about the working world. Here is a sneak peak of a few of the gems he provides in the article: Commitments. Your reputation is based not on how many commitments you keep but on how few commitments you don't. Innovation. Great ideas are dime-a-dozen; what matters is execution. Presentations. There's a special place in hell reserved for whoever invented PowerPoint. Selling. The ultimate purpose of all sales activity is to help other people become happier. Success. Measure success by how much you accomplish, not by how much money you make. Check out the full article for more of the "single most important things you need to know," according to James. Have a topic or suggestion for a blog post you'd like to see? Let us know! Email us - blog@amtransportonline.com...
Best PracticesTransportation

Ending the Quarter, Beginning a New One For many companies around the United States, today is a particularly important, and at times particularly stressful, day - end of the month AND end of the quarter (EOM and EOQ, respectively). In the logistics and transportation world, these two days tend to present their own special challenges: inventory, quotas, dock space, truck capacity, quarterly reports...
Best PracticesTransportation

*article originally posted on LinkedIn Work Well With Others Business etiquette is one of those invisible operations working throughout our companies and processes every day - you don't always see it in action, but you certainly notice when it is missing or when something goes wrong. I'm sure you have been the recipient of a painful email from a colleague with less than stellar etiquette (and it probably made you cringe, just a little). But how do you correct poor business etiquette? A.J. Jacobs wrote a post to cover that topic specifically - The 11 Best Business Etiquette Tips. Speaking about his own experience of the "Oops" email, he outlines common business etiquette faux pas and 11 ways to correct them, drawing from a book by Ross McCammon. Here is the quick list. Be sure to check out the full article for more info: 1. "Sorry. Sure. Great. Yes." - Respond to email as if you were Robert De Niro 2. "I have no idea what you are asking. Can you please explain?" - Embrace your ignorance instead of offering up a bogus, uninformed opinion 3. "Smile 20% wider than feels comfortable" - Give it the ol' Julia Roberts 4. "In the short term, I probably did 'better' work, but in the long term I did worse work because I didn’t allow myself to get my mistakes over with early." - Make mistakes 5. "Do not look down, to the side, through them, at their chest, into their souls" - Look everyone in the eye 6. "If you're bored, then whoever you’re pitching to is going to be REALLY bored" - Don't get bored 7. "With handshakes, the key part of your anatomy is not the palm, but the weblike area between the thumb and forefinger" - When shaking hands, get up in there 8. "Like the opera singers do. Wider. Speak louder. Louder." - Open your mouth when making a speech 9. "In business, you must assume that everyone is rooting for you." - Be delusionally confident 10. "Clothes can actually put you in a different psychological state" - Wear decent clothes 11. "Your work should not be perfect. Your work should be wrinkled. It should show wear, and it should indicate that you’re trying new things and taking chances." - Be intentionally imperfect Want more advice on etiquette and other business skills? Check out the book Works Well With Others: An Outsider's Guide to Shaking Hands, Shutting Up, Handling Jerks, and Other Crucial Skills in Business No One ever Teaches You by Ross McCammon Have a topic or suggestion for a blog post you'd like to see? Let us know! Email us - blog@amtransportonline.com...
Best PracticesProductivityTransportation

"We all have the same 168 hours in a week. But not all of them are created equal." This is the tagline for the article by Shane Parrish posted on Observer.com (read the full article here) that discusses the secret to productivity - get up earlier than everyone else. Shane talks with a man named Joel, who has successfully found a way to balance work, family, writing, reading, and hobbies all in his 24-hour day (same 24 hours as ours, which is hard to believe). Joel says his only secret is that he just gets up earlier. That's it. We’re more creative and more productive. Shane goes on in the article to explain that the early morning hours are great for doing tough work or working on creative projects because you don't get constantly interrupted. No meetings, no phone calls, no fires to put out...